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Thermally Modified Wood

Thermal Modification

 

of wood (TMW) is a unique process that uses high heat and steam to alter the dimensional composition of timber.  The wood is now less absorbent to moisture resulting in an increase of material stability with less warping and minimal expansion and contraction. The organic compounds are essentially cooked out of the wood removing the properties that cause rot and attract insects while maintaining the natural beauty and design element of the natural wood grain. The result of this conversion also turns the wood into a darker, richer color resembling the look of exotic hardwoods but using locally sourced sustainable FSC certified forests. Ash, oak, and pine are the most common species used in the thermally modified process.

 

Eco-Friendly and Sustainable:

Using locally sourced timber, the carbon footprint is reduced with local domestic transportation. Thermally modified wood has a longer life expectancy reducing the need to harvest more trees to replace a traditional outdoor wood install.  Also, it is important to note there are no chemicals used in this process. Only heat and steam are used.   

 

Strength and Durability:

The natural acids and sugars are modified from the extreme heat which changes the physical structure of the wood. The wood’s ability to absorb moisture is greatly reduced making it much less susceptible to rot and decay. This reduction in moisture absorption results in increased material stability with less warping and minimal expansion and contraction.

Appearance:

During the heating process the wood naturally turns darker with rich brown hues that vary from amber to dark brown, depending on the species and the extent of temperature used in the kiln. All the while, sustaining the beauty and design element of the natural wood grain.

Thermally modified wood is a great option in environments that are usually unfavorable to wood, including exterior siding, decking or anywhere a low-maintenance natural wood product is desired. Less fiber saturation means the material is now less susceptible to humidity and temperature-induced expansion and contraction, which is ideal for climates with wide fluctuations, like the Pacific Northwest, Midwest, and East Coast.

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